Window Replacement Guide

Investing in a window replacement, whether it’s one window or all of the windows in your Georgia home, requires careful scrutiny of the available options. While new windows call for a sizeable investment, making effective choices now can pay off down the road. Use this quick guide to window replacements to get the most for your money.

Efficiency

Perhaps the single most important factor to consider, the efficiency of the windows will make or break your home comfort and your energy bills, too. The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) and Energy Star usually have labels on windows. If the window meets certain standards, it will feature the Energy Star label. Energy Star breaks down their labels according to climate, so use their guide to purchase window replacements. Other labels include:

  • U-factor (or U-value). This is the number that shows how well the window keeps heat inside. The lower the number, the better the window performs.
  • Solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC). Another rating that shows how well the window keeps heat out, or blocks the sun’s heat from penetrating through the window’s glass. In this case, the lower the number, the higher the performance. This is a rating that Georgia homeowners should consider, as the climate requires that homes stay cool over the long, hot summer.
  • Visible transmittance. This rating shows how much light the window will let into the home. The higher the number, the more light will come through.

Aesthetics and function

Along with efficiency, you’ll need to consider the look and function of the window. Options include: wood-framed windows, which offer a pleasing look but can be costly; vinyl-framed windows, which are cost-effective and require little maintenance; and fiberglass framed windows, which are relatively new to the market and are durable.

Window functions range from:

  • Double-hung windows. With a bottom and top portion of the window, both of which can be pushed up or down to allow access to fresh air. These windows are also easy to clean.
  • Single-hung windows. Only the bottom portion of the window can slide up. This option is less costly than double-hung windows.
  • Casement windows. The window is usually separated into two parts, and the windows crank open in an outward motion.
  • Awning windows. Feature one single pane of glass that moves outward from the bottom and lifts up.
  • Fixed windows. These windows don’t open at all.

Do you have window replacement questions? Contact the experts at Findlay Roofing any time for answers. We’re happy to help!

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