5 popular roof types in Atlanta

Georgia's hot, humid climates call for a certain type of roofing that won't work in drier, colder places. For instance, materials designed to withstand snow and ice are effective options for homeowners living in northern regions; however, these same roof types won't stand up to the heat and humidity of places such as Bartow or Cherokee counties.

Learn the most popular roof types in the greater Atlanta area, taking into consideration the aesthetics as well as the function of the roof.

  1. Metal. Metal roofs function effectively in humid climates. New technologies have allowed manufacturers to create rust-proof metal roofs that resist the soggy air of the South. As an added bonus, a metal roof won't encourage the growth of algae common in some singled roofs. Furthermore, a metal roof won't have problems with shingles blowing off in the wind.
  2. Gable. A popular option, the gable roof pops up all over the United States. With its center-peaked roof, the sloping sides of the roof create an A-shaped frame when viewed from the front. Gabled roofs offer optimal air circulation — an important component of a well-maintained attic and home — as well as drainage. This roof also creates lots of space on the upper floor of a home, and it's easy and affordable to construct.
  3. Hip. While the gable roof employs two sloping sides, the hip roof has four sloping sides. As a result, the slopes create an overhang on all sides of the home, creating shade and promoting efficiency. A durable roof, it's ideal for areas that receive gusty winds, and it resists sun and rain damage. The equal line of all four sides makes the installation of gutters an easy process, too.
  4. Mansard. Derived from French and Victorian roof styles of the 17th century, Mansard roofs have a steep upper slope, giving way to a lower section on the perimeter that is flat and vertical. The almost box-like shape of this style creates a huge amount of living space. The design of the roof may not hold up well under the weight of snow; however, it's a viable option for homeowners in the South and Southwest.
  5. Gambrel. This style dots farmland across the country, so the gambrel design is very reminiscent of the typical American barn. The design features two roof sides joining at the peak, following a slope. The style makes for lots of available square footage in the living areas below it, as well as lots of attic storage.

When choosing to replace or design the roof of your home, take into consideration the durability and appearance of the roof. Talk to your contractor about the roof's efficiency, installation and materials costs, and roof types.

Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

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